/ Christian Living / Christmas Conversation #7: What’s the most meaningful Christmas tradition that your family has?

Christmas Conversation #7: What’s the most meaningful Christmas tradition that your family has?


Christmas Conversation #7: What’s the most meaningful Christmas tradition that your family has? By Stacey Tuttle –

Christmas for many is a time of traditions.  Some are fun…some are serious…some are serving…some are receiving…  And usually, we maintain a tradition because it has some meaning to us, some value that makes it worth repeating.

But not everyone had a family that celebrated Christmas well.  Maybe their family was broken.  Maybe their family wasn’t Christian.  Who knows all the reasons why?

Or maybe it’s not that they didn’t have good family traditions, but maybe someone out there is just looking to add to what is already a rich Christmas tradition in their home.

For anyone out there who may be looking for ideas on how to make their Christmas celebrations better, we want to ask you to share your ideas and experiences.

What is the most meaningful Christmas tradition that your family has?

Check out our other Christmas Conversations:

We have 25 different “conversations” going online and we’d love to hear your thoughts!  See the list below and add your two cents when and where you can, and benefit from the collective think tank as you go!

  1. How do you keep the spirit of giving in your Cristmas shopping?
  2. How do you bring Jesus into your shopping experience?
  3. What do you think about Christmas music?
  4. What’s the worst Christmas song and why?
  5. What’s your best idea for using a Christmas movie to spark a conversation about Christ?
  6. What’s the worst Christmas movie and why?
  7. What’s the most meaningful Christmas tradition that your family has?
  8. How do you get your kids attention (or even your own) off of the gifts you get?
  9. How much is too much when it comes to giving your kids gifts for Christmas?
  10. What are your favorite service-oriented things to do during Christmas?
  11. Is Santa a naughty or nice Christmas tradition and why?
  12. What Christmas traditions have you chosen not to follow, and what have you replaced them with?
  13. If you’ve chosen to do Santa, how can you use him to point your kids to Jesus?
  14. Do lighting displays add to or detract from the real meaning of Christmas?
  15. What kinds of gifts can you give to non-Christian friends that make Jesus attractive?
  16. What are your best ideas for using Christmas to spur conversations about Jesus?
  17. Happy Holidays vs. Merry Christmas – Does it really matter?
  18. Should we boycott stores based on Christian principles during the Holidays?
  19. How do you deal with the Grinches in your life this Christmas?
  20. How do you deal with Christmas as a joyous family time when family is hard? 
  21. What do you know about the Biblical concept of hospitality and how do you apply that during the Christmas season?
  22. How do you find spiritual refreshment in the midst of an exhausting season?
  23. When do the excesses of Christmas cross the line from communicating the lavishness of God’s love for us to fostering excess, greed and pride?
  24. How do you respond to feeling like someone else “does Christmas better” than you?
  25. What is the most meaningful Christmas memory you have?
12 POST COMMENT

Leave a Reply

12 Comments
  • December 6, 2011

    One of our favorites is to go through poor neighborhoods on horseback as Santa’s helpers (Santa is on horseback with us, of course!) giving out candy and money to people we meet. It’s become a yearly tradition that family and friends alike all join in on.

    It is really special to be a part of giving in this way…to strangers. It is one thing to give to those you love, another to give to those you don’t even know. Somehow our hearts swell up in love for strangers in those moments. I find that giving binds you to the recipient in a supernatural way.

    And every year there are stories which remind us why we do this. Stories of some one or family who has been struggling mightily with nearly overwhelming circumstances. It’s not that we are able to give enough to fix the circumstances, or that money can undo the pain, suffering or loss they are facing–but it isn’t so much about fixing the problems as it is encouraging them to face them. Somehow, a random gift, whether it’s $5 or $100…or just a candy bar given with a “Merry Christmas, God bless you”…something so simple can lighten the burden. Something given by a stranger can make you feel suddenly seen.

    I don’t know why it is, but I have seen it in my own life. When a friend encourages you, well, you expect that. They know you; they know what you’re going through–they have to, you told them all about it after all. But when some random stranger pauses to notice you, to say something kind, to give you a random gift–somehow that is different. It’s usually a stranger that God chooses to be the messenger to let me know, “I see you. I am with you always. Be encouraged and be not afraid.” They seem to communicate that message to me better than any loved one, mostly because it is so wholly unexpected from them.

    So, maybe that is why this tradition is so special. It’s fun to be on cruising around on horseback down the neighborhood streets. It’s fun to be with friends in our Santa hats helping Santa himself. It’s fun to give out gifts and make people happy. It’s fun to do something so completely novel – it’s not exactly a common Christimas tradition! But more than all of this, more than anything, I think what makes this so wonderful is that it positions us to be in a place that God can use us, complete strangers, to communicate his message of love and encouragement to so many who are in desperate need. It’s not that we will be there for them, it’s not that our gifts will fix their problems, it’s simply a reminder that GOD sees them, HE is with them…Emmanuel, God with us.

    Stacey Tuttle
    Reply
  • December 6, 2011

    We just started this one last year but since we did it again this year I guess we can call it a tradition, right? As each person hangs an ornament on the tree, they tell everyone some blessing or act of God from the past year that the ornament symbolizes. Each ornament becomes a kind of “standing stone” (Ex. 24:2-4) to remind us of God’s faithfulness. Sometimes the thing remembered is symbolized by the ornament (like my daughter Lynae made an icicle a reminder of ways God has “grown us” in our faith this past year) and sometimes not, but as we see the tree throughout the season, different ornaments remind us of all the things shared. It makes the decorating of the tree an act of thankfulness that has become very special to us.

    Craig
    Reply
  • December 7, 2011

    One of my favorite traditions we started a few years ago is something we like to do on Christmas Eve. For us, Christmas Eve is hectic with church. So when we get home with like to get these little chimes out. Each chime plays a different note. We all take 2 and we play christmas songs. I love doing this because it helps slow things down after a crazy evening. :)

    Rochelle
    Reply
  • December 8, 2011

    Kids Neighborhood Caroling – every year we gather all of the kids in the neighborhood and go caroling. (12 years ago I prayed for God to bring lots of kids that don’t go to church to our neighborhood – and He DID! There are bunches). It’s usually pretty cold so we hit maybe 15 houses or so. I have several sets of sleigh bells that the kids take turns ringing so that everyone can hear us coming. The best part comes afterward though. Everyone comes back to our house and we share hot chocolate and cookies, sing Christmas songs and best of all… we talk about the Christmas Story. A few years ago, I was telling the story around the kitchen table with some kids and when I got to the part about Mary having a baby I asked, “Do you know what she named that baby?” With wide eyes, several kids responded, “NO, WHAT?” They hadn’t heard the whole story before. It was a great time to share the story of Jesus’ birth and that He came to save us with these curious little kids!

    Reply
  • Pingback:Christmas Conversation #15: What kind of gifts can you give to non-Christian friends that make Jesus attractive?

  • Pingback:Christmas Conversation #10: What are your favorite service-oriented things to do during Christmas?

  • Pingback:Christmas Conversation #20: How do you deal with Christmas as a joyous family time when family is hard?

  • Pingback:Christmas Conversation #1: How do you keep the spirit of giving in your Christmas shopping?

  • December 17, 2011

    Before, breakfast we have one cupcake and sing Happy Birthday to Jesus. Then the kids may open the presents and enjoy the gifts . But thru out the day now that they are getting older the question many things about the gifts Jesus got and how he was not born in a clean hospital.lol

    PAULA
    Reply
  • Pingback:Christmas Conversation #18: Should we boycott stores based on Christian principles during the holidays?

  • Pingback:Christmas Conversation #22: How do you find spiritual refreshment in the midst of an exhausting season?

  • Pingback:Christmas Conversation #23: When do the excesses of Christmas cross the line from communicating the lavishness of God’s love for us to fostering excess, greed and pride?